This Belongs in a Museum

Once called the "Stephen Fry of Museum Blogging," this tumblog, written by a frustrated museologist, is dedicated to the small, random museums and weird attractions of the world. Always informative, usually funny, sometimes offensive.

Bringing you museum-approved grammatical errors and typos since 2010.

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The Top Ten Best Museums to Visit on Easter:
1. Ukrainian Easter Egg Museum
Ukraine might be having some problems right now, to put it lightly, but it’s home to the only museum in the world dedicated to the Ukrainian easter egg (pysanka) that also happens to be in a egg-shaped building. 
2. Germany’s Easter Egg Museum
Easter eggs originated in Germany so it’s more than appropriate that the country has an Ostereimuseum with over 900 eggs on display.
3. Museum of Russian Icons
You got to give a shout out to Orthodox Easter with this Massachusetts museum that has over 500 icons and artifacts spanning over six centuries in its collection.
4. Bunny Museum
A couple converted their Pasadena home into a museum of quirky collectibles, now numbering 28,000 bunnies. There’s even a giant bunny bush in front of the building. 

5. Cathedral Buffet’s Life of Christ Display
If you happen to be in Ohio and you’re hungry, why not go to this Christian restaurant, which has thirteen miniature dioramas of Jesus’ life in its basement. 

6. Cyclorama of Jerusalem
Open since the 1950s, visitors can experience what the city of Jerusalem looked like during the crucifixion of Jesus Christ with one of the world’s largest circular paintings (in Quebec of all places).

7. Cross Garden
Alabama is one of America’s most religious states, so it’s not a surprise there is an attraction with hundreds of home-made crosses warning the people out there who have yet to be saved.

8. Salvation Mountain
This famous art installation made of adobe, straw, and thousands of gallons of paint was created by a local artist who found the Lord Jesus Christ in the 1960s. Remember Jesus Is The Way.

9. Desert Christ Park 
Speaking of California outdoor art, the state is also home to a collection of 40 all-plaster Jesus statues, with the main highlight being a massive “last supper”.
10. Nun Doll Museum
I know nuns don’t automatically make you think of Easter, but Cross in the Woods is a National Catholic Shrine located in Northern Michigan that is home not only to the world’s largest crucifix but also a collection of over 500 nun dolls. So why not make a day out of it!

Honorable Mentions: Belgium’s Museum of Cocoa and Chocolate, Nantucket Basket Museum, Burlingame Museum of PEZ Memorabilia

The Top Ten Best Museums to Visit on Easter:

1. Ukrainian Easter Egg Museum

Ukraine might be having some problems right now, to put it lightly, but it’s home to the only museum in the world dedicated to the Ukrainian easter egg (pysanka) that also happens to be in a egg-shaped building.

2. Germany’s Easter Egg Museum

Easter eggs originated in Germany so it’s more than appropriate that the country has an Ostereimuseum with over 900 eggs on display.

3. Museum of Russian Icons

You got to give a shout out to Orthodox Easter with this Massachusetts museum that has over 500 icons and artifacts spanning over six centuries in its collection.

4. Bunny Museum

A couple converted their Pasadena home into a museum of quirky collectibles, now numbering 28,000 bunnies. There’s even a giant bunny bush in front of the building.

5. Cathedral Buffet’s Life of Christ Display

If you happen to be in Ohio and you’re hungry, why not go to this Christian restaurant, which has thirteen miniature dioramas of Jesus’ life in its basement. 

6. Cyclorama of Jerusalem

Open since the 1950s, visitors can experience what the city of Jerusalem looked like during the crucifixion of Jesus Christ with one of the world’s largest circular paintings (in Quebec of all places).

7. Cross Garden

Alabama is one of America’s most religious states, so it’s not a surprise there is an attraction with hundreds of home-made crosses warning the people out there who have yet to be saved.

8. Salvation Mountain

This famous art installation made of adobe, straw, and thousands of gallons of paint was created by a local artist who found the Lord Jesus Christ in the 1960s. Remember Jesus Is The Way.

9. Desert Christ Park

Speaking of California outdoor art, the state is also home to a collection of 40 all-plaster Jesus statues, with the main highlight being a massive “last supper”.

10. Nun Doll Museum

I know nuns don’t automatically make you think of Easter, but Cross in the Woods is a National Catholic Shrine located in Northern Michigan that is home not only to the world’s largest crucifix but also a collection of over 500 nun dolls. So why not make a day out of it!

Honorable Mentions: Belgium’s Museum of Cocoa and Chocolate, Nantucket Basket Museum, Burlingame Museum of PEZ Memorabilia

Patti Smith once sang in the song Gloria these immortal words: “Jesus died for somebody’s sins but not mine.” Well, today is the day, guys. On Wednesday I told you about some bronze statues peeing outside the Kafka Museum. But now I have a completely different collection of sculptures for you. In Yucca Valley, Desert Christ Park depicts Jesus’ time on Earth. As visitors walk around the 3.5 acre site they are greeted by 40 all-plaster statues, with the main highlight being a massive “last supper” that people can add themselves into, you know, for a Japanese tourist photo. If you’re wondering how Christ Park started, you need to go back to 1951 when the property was owned by Reverend Eddie Garver. It was his vision to establish a Christian-themed park as a light for world peace. He soon met Frank Antone Martin, a sculptor-poet and engineer, who came up with the idea to create “Jesus” statues out of steel-reinforced concrete. Desert Christ Park was dedicated on Easter Sunday of that year with a resurrected statue. Anyway, here we are over 60 years later and the park is still with us. Unfortunately, it’s free so a few statues are missing limbs and there is a lot of graffiti on the trail. But art, whether Christ-like or not, will always be disrespected, especially when it’s out in the elements of the harsh desert conditions. That it survives at all is a miracle!

(Image Source)

When it comes to public art, it can either be annoying and pointless (like children falling down while holding hands) or really weird and completely random. We’ve covered some strange statues before, like the "Child Eater" in Switzerland, the Boll Weevil Monument in Alabama, and the Beatles in Kazakhstan. Well, here’s another one to add to the list.
Located in Malá Straná, on the small plaza right outside the Kafka Museum (I wonder what he would have to say about this?) is a fountain made by sculptor David Černý. Created in 2004, the appropriately titled Piss depicts two bronze figures on opposite ends of a pool with swiveling hips and moving male genitalia from which steady streams of water write out quotes from famous Czechs. And the pool just happens to be shaped like the Czech Republic, so they’re peeing directly onto their homeland. How controversial and amusing! Anyway, if you happen to be visiting this public artwork, you can call a number listed nearby and send a text message. Guess what? The sculptures will write (or should I say pee) out your words. How interactive! In a 2009 interview, Černý said the figures are “an apt commentary on the self-deprecating Czechs, who [he] contends have gritted their teeth through centuries of invasion and occupation, barely resisting and seldom winning at anything.” How political!



(Image Source)

When it comes to public art, it can either be annoying and pointless (like children falling down while holding hands) or really weird and completely random. We’ve covered some strange statues before, like the "Child Eater" in Switzerland, the Boll Weevil Monument in Alabama, and the Beatles in Kazakhstan. Well, here’s another one to add to the list.

Located in Malá Straná, on the small plaza right outside the Kafka Museum (I wonder what he would have to say about this?) is a fountain made by sculptor David Černý. Created in 2004, the appropriately titled Piss depicts two bronze figures on opposite ends of a pool with swiveling hips and moving male genitalia from which steady streams of water write out quotes from famous Czechs. And the pool just happens to be shaped like the Czech Republic, so they’re peeing directly onto their homeland. How controversial and amusing! Anyway, if you happen to be visiting this public artwork, you can call a number listed nearby and send a text message. Guess what? The sculptures will write (or should I say pee) out your words. How interactive! In a 2009 interview, Černý said the figures are “an apt commentary on the self-deprecating Czechs, who [he] contends have gritted their teeth through centuries of invasion and occupation, barely resisting and seldom winning at anything.” How political!

(Image Source)

I once told you about that time I visited the Ramones Museum in Berlin. I’ve also told you about many small museums, like the 22 square foot closet known as Edgar’s Closet, the Micro Mµseum in Somerville, the World’s Largest Collection of the Smallest Versions of Large Things as well as the Smallest House in Great Britain (because of course I have to go to the world’s tiniest house museum). Anyway, if you think it’s impossible to combine the teeny tiny with America’s first punk band, well, you are wrong. If you say it can’t be done, it has been done…in a seaside suburb of Dublin…inside a Mexican restaurant (of course there is a Facebook). Lifelong Ramones devotee and restaurant owner Colin Ring (hey, that name doesn’t sound Mexican) started it as a way to get his collection out of the house and in front of the band’s fans. He describes it as “exactly the kind of restaurant [he’d] visit if [he] didn’t own [the] restaurant” and believes “Sheena is a Punk Rocker” changed his life. His favourite item in the collection is the “Swallow my Pride” single, which was released on Phillips Ireland (I guess back then countries would press their own version of a single or LP). At the world’s smallest Ramones museum, visitors (or should I say restaurant patrons) can look at backstage passes, tickets and an early fan club newsletter while drinking margaritas and eating chicken enchiladas.

In better news, THIS BELONGS IN A MUSEUM received a shout-out from americanguide. The Guardian named them as one of the best independent travel magazines. You can read the original article here. Thanks again, guys!

(via rollerscmods)