This Belongs in a Museum

Once called the "Stephen Fry of Museum Blogging," this tumblog, written by a frustrated museologist, is dedicated to the small, random museums and weird attractions of the world. Always informative, usually funny, sometimes offensive.

Bringing you museum-approved grammatical errors and typos since 2010.

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A garden gnome, hereafter known as the Divorce Day Mad Dwarf, was hurled in fury at a windscreen of a new car in Ljubljana, Slovenia over 20 years ago. It’s part of the Museum of Broken Relationships in Zagreb, Croatia. The museum encourages people to keep hold of the mementos of former loves - and puts them on display - everything from love tokens and a Venetian glass horse to a prosthetic leg and a wedding dress.

“The exhibits in the Museum of Broken Relationships are as random and  varied as the reasons people get together, and break up. Each item is  presented with a summary of the dates and locations of the relationship,  and annotations by their donors. They are often of little, if any, intrinsic worth, but they hold or held  value because of who gave them to us. Whether we keep them, bin them or  burn them in pentangles while chanting incantations and spritzing them  with holy water, they will always mean something.”
via Guardian Travel

A garden gnome, hereafter known as the Divorce Day Mad Dwarf, was hurled in fury at a windscreen of a new car in Ljubljana, Slovenia over 20 years ago. It’s part of the Museum of Broken Relationships in Zagreb, Croatia. The museum encourages people to keep hold of the mementos of former loves - and puts them on display - everything from love tokens and a Venetian glass horse to a prosthetic leg and a wedding dress.

“The exhibits in the Museum of Broken Relationships are as random and varied as the reasons people get together, and break up. Each item is presented with a summary of the dates and locations of the relationship, and annotations by their donors. They are often of little, if any, intrinsic worth, but they hold or held value because of who gave them to us. Whether we keep them, bin them or burn them in pentangles while chanting incantations and spritzing them with holy water, they will always mean something.”

via Guardian Travel