This Belongs in a Museum

Once called the "Stephen Fry of Museum Blogging," this tumblog, written by a frustrated museologist, is dedicated to the small, random museums and weird attractions of the world. Always informative, usually funny, sometimes offensive.

Bringing you museum-approved grammatical errors and typos since 2010.

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Posts tagged "art"

With the exception of a few random places like Shankar’s International Dolls Museum, Vishala Environmental Centre for Heritage and Arts’ Utensils Museum and Sudha Cars Museum, the blog hasn’t spent much time in India. Well, let me change that with this next post. Second only to the Taj Mahal in India’s tourism department, the Rock Garden of Chandigarh is probably one of the best known examples of outsider art. Beginning in 1957, government official Nek Chand began collecting materials from demolition sites in his spare time. He then made art out of the scrap and other waste materials, using bottles, glass, bangles, tiles, ceramic pots, and sinks. But he had to work in secret because he was using a location near Sukhna Lake in a deeply-wooded gorge, which had been designated as a land conservancy. By the time the authorities found out in 1975 Chand’s garden had grown into a 12-acre complex (today it is over 40 acres) of man-made interlinked waterfalls and courtyards filled with hundreds of concrete sculptures. You’d think a one-of-a-kind sanctuary would have faced the bulldozers. But despite protests and calls for Chand to be punished, the rock garden was turned into a public space and the artist continued his work. In 1990, a road for the exclusive use of VIPs was to be built right through the middle of the garden and trees were cleared for its construction. There was a lengthy court battle, eventually resulting in victory. But when Chand left the country in 1996 the government withdrew its funding and the park was vandalised. That incident, and the governmental scandal that resulted from it, birthed the Nek Chand Foundation, a non-profit organization that ensures his work will remain preserved, protected and open to the public for many years to come.

(Image Source 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

Siberia is a lonely place. One woman in the far away remote village of Kamarchaga, located in the Siberian Taiga, has found a very entertaining hobby to help pass the time. Russian pensioner Olga Kostina has decorated her wooden home with over 30,000 plastic bottle caps. Over several years she collected caps from soda bottles and began using them to decorate the walls of her house with colorful patterns and images. Using a hammer and nails, she placed every single bottle cap by hand to create traditional macrame motifs and various images of creatures living in the neighboring woodland. Her home has become a local landmark. And she’s not planning on stopping her work until her house and adjacent structures are completely covered in bottle caps. Something tells me that she has the time. 

(Image Source)

Today is Andy Warhol’s birthday. He would have been 86 years old if he was still living life and stuff. Probably his most famous “artwork” (if you can call it that…I’m not much of a fan of pop art, to be honest) is Campbell’s Soup Cans. I’m sure everyone knows what I am talking about so no need for a scholarly art explanation, but I bet you didn’t know there are two giant Campbell’s soup cans in the United States. One is in Napoleon, Ohio and the other is in Fort Collins, Colorado. The story behind the Ohio can is that it’s located next to an actual soup plant, but the one in Colorado sports an actual signature so it’s, like, a real art piece, guys. Apparently there was an Andy Warhol exhibit at Colorado State University in 1981. The artist himself was there to unveil three large-scale soup cans, but only one outlived its 15 minutes of fame. Like any tin can, the item eventually rusted and was retired in 1991. After a brief reappearance in 2008, the artwork was restored and returned to the School of the Arts last year. But what I really want to know - are the cans full of tomato soup?

(Image Source 1 & 2)