This Belongs in a Museum

Once called the "Stephen Fry of Museum Blogging," this tumblog, written by a frustrated museologist, is dedicated to the small, random museums and weird attractions of the world. Always informative, usually funny, sometimes offensive.

Bringing you museum-approved grammatical errors and typos since 2010.

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It’s probably already tomorrow in China, but that’s not going to stop me from telling you about the June 4th Museum. It is the world’s first permanent memorial museum for the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, which occurred exactly 25 years ago. The exhibit is just 800 square feet and hidden away on the 5th floor of the Foo Hoo Centre (which means you really have to find it as there is no indication the museum even exists, apart from a listing in the lobby directory). The protests remain a taboo topic in mainland China, but nearly 7,000 people have visited the museum since it opened a few months ago. At the entrance is a six-foot tall replica of the “Goddess of Democracy” statue that was famously erected by the protesters. While walking through a labyrinthine layout that reflects “the maze which is the China of today” visitors learn about the protests through photographs, artifacts, videos and written histories of the events. There is a grass-covered central area, modeled on Tiananmen as it looked back then. The area is surrounded by twisted maps of Beijing’s roads showing the 200 locations where students were killed. Visitors can also write messages of support on a narrow chalkboard running the length of a wall. Despite legal objections to the exhibit, curator Andrew Lam Hon-kin (shown in the photograph above) says it is a “civic space” open for debate. “We would like to extend the discussion about the country’s development from 1989 to today…Its goal is to change society…It is a museum of activism…and our ultimate goal is to rectify the verdict on June 4.”
(Image Source)

It’s probably already tomorrow in China, but that’s not going to stop me from telling you about the June 4th Museum. It is the world’s first permanent memorial museum for the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989, which occurred exactly 25 years ago. The exhibit is just 800 square feet and hidden away on the 5th floor of the Foo Hoo Centre (which means you really have to find it as there is no indication the museum even exists, apart from a listing in the lobby directory). The protests remain a taboo topic in mainland China, but nearly 7,000 people have visited the museum since it opened a few months ago. At the entrance is a six-foot tall replica of the “Goddess of Democracy” statue that was famously erected by the protesters. While walking through a labyrinthine layout that reflects “the maze which is the China of today” visitors learn about the protests through photographs, artifacts, videos and written histories of the events. There is a grass-covered central area, modeled on Tiananmen as it looked back then. The area is surrounded by twisted maps of Beijing’s roads showing the 200 locations where students were killed. Visitors can also write messages of support on a narrow chalkboard running the length of a wall. Despite legal objections to the exhibit, curator Andrew Lam Hon-kin (shown in the photograph above) says it is a “civic space” open for debate. “We would like to extend the discussion about the country’s development from 1989 to today…Its goal is to change society…It is a museum of activism…and our ultimate goal is to rectify the verdict on June 4.”

(Image Source)

I just read on-line that a museum in Berlin, the Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe, has a Vincent van Gogh art piece on display. But this isn’t a newly discovered painting by the Dutch master, no, this is a copy of his ear (you know, the one he famously cut off) that was grown using some of the artist’s genetic material.
The DNA samples were provided by Lieuwe van Gogh, the great-great-grandson of Vincent’s brother, Theo. They share about 1/16th of the same genes, including the Y-chromosome that is passed down the male lineage.
The artist Diemut Strebe said she wanted to “combine art and science”.
According to the article, “the ear is grown from tissue engineered cartilage and is ‘identical’ in shape to van Gogh’s ear by using computer imaging technology. It is composed of living cells that contain natural genetic information about him as well as engineered components, replicating in the ear as a ‘living art-piece.’”
(Image Source)

I just read on-line that a museum in Berlin, the Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe, has a Vincent van Gogh art piece on display. But this isn’t a newly discovered painting by the Dutch master, no, this is a copy of his ear (you know, the one he famously cut off) that was grown using some of the artist’s genetic material.

The DNA samples were provided by Lieuwe van Gogh, the great-great-grandson of Vincent’s brother, Theo. They share about 1/16th of the same genes, including the Y-chromosome that is passed down the male lineage.

The artist Diemut Strebe said she wanted to “combine art and science”.

According to the article, “the ear is grown from tissue engineered cartilage and is ‘identical’ in shape to van Gogh’s ear by using computer imaging technology. It is composed of living cells that contain natural genetic information about him as well as engineered components, replicating in the ear as a ‘living art-piece.’”

(Image Source)

Believe it or not, America’s only Einstein Museum is located at the back of a 97-year-old clothing store known for its woolen sweaters and tweed blazers. Among the fine lodens and cashmeres for sale in Landau’s on Nassau Street in Princeton is an exhibit full of reproduced photographs and documents, as well as other memorabilia related to Albert Einstein. In 1933, Albert Einstein renounced his German citizenship and briefly took refuge in England, before moving to New Jersey where he worked until his death in 1955. But Einstein’s connection to the university town isn’t the reason why the museum exists, it actually began with the 1994 romantic comedy I.Q., which starred Walter Mattheu as the world’s most famous genius. While making the film a few locals let Landau borrow some Einstein artifacts, which led to the permanent exhibit five years later. In 2005, the university finally put up a monument honouring Einstein in a nearby park. Why it took so long to recognise to world’s most famous scientist is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma that can only be solved by Einstein himself. 

(Image Source 1 & 2)